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H.O.P.E. – Help One Person Everyday and That Person Is YOU! - 043

podcast self-esteem Sep 18, 2017

Hey ADDers! I’m so glad you could join me for today. As Jim Rohn said, “For things to change, you have to change.” He was referring to your attitude and your mindset. Seriously! So let’s get to it!

HOPE is essential for you to achieve beyond your current limits. If you don’t have HOPE that your life can be different, then you must borrow my HOPE. I have an abundance of HOPE, and will gladly loan you as much as you need until you have restored your own.

When it comes to HOPE, there are two groups of people: High HOPE people and Low HOPE people. Let me tell you a little bit about each of them. High HOPE people set difficult goals for themselves and have several goals in different life areas at the same time. They embrace their goals and view them as welcome challenges. They use their goals as mental touchstones for success, direct their attention and effort to the demands of the situation, and are spurred on by obstacles to greater effort. They think of alternative routes to their goals when things get tough, and they are getting blocked. They apply themselves to the path that is most likely to work for them. They have a strong connection to their life goals and expect to obtain excellent returns on their mental investments. And they are typically optimistic, have a sense of control over their life, good problem-solving abilities, high self-esteem, and a positive mood.

Low HOPE people tend to quit because they are not trained to think of alternative routes; they have one route and they go that route. They do not actively pursue goals and are more concerned with protecting themselves than striking out to achieve. They are typically pessimistic, have no real sense of control over their life, have limited problem-solving abilities, lower self-esteem, and have a less positive mood. And, they tend to believe that things are tougher than they really are. This creates stress and a narrow vision of how best to go about solving the problem.

In this episode, I’m going to talk about how you can make the changes you need to make so things can change of you for the better.

In the program, you’ll learn from my 30+ years of experience in weekly coaching calls, workshops, and a private forum space for deep personal work with other like-minded adults where you have access to me 6 days a week for support, solutions and accountability.  I don’t believe in Band-Aids that will only disappear down the road.  I believe in helping you move from stuck to unstoppable by getting to whatever you’re missing and need to learn.  We’ve all had a belly full of judgment, criticism and punishment, whether it’s come from others or ourselves.  I encourage you to break free of that life and join us for your ADDventures in Achievement™.  Until then, become part of the Facebook community I created, Living Beyond ADHD, where I go live for Q & A about your most pressing issues as an adult with ADHD.

Developing your Executive Function Skills and shifting your limiting beliefs is the fastest and most effective way to overcome ADHD limitations, find focus, gain confidence, and newfound freedom in your life!

My mission is to put an end to the worldwide needless suffering of adults with ADHD and those with under-developed Executive Function Skills - whether from ADHD, chronic depression or anxiety, trauma, addictions, or chronic illnesses.  And, you don't need a formal diagnosis to know you need help developing these executive function skills in order to greatly reduce your suffering.

 

Full Episode Transcript Today is Episode 43 with Dr B

Hey ADDers! I’m so glad you could join me for today. As Jim Rohn said, “For things to change, you have to change.” He was referring to your attitude and your mindset. Seriously! So let’s get to it!

First, I want you to take a couple of deep relaxing breaths; just breathing in deeply and exhaling slowly; just a couple of breaths to center yourself and be fully present. Next, I want you to relax your mind and use your imagination as I describe some of today’s characters. Good for you, and it’s a WIN if you took the minute to set the stage for what comes next. I want to introduce you to HOPE. HOPE is an attitude and a mindset; one where you’re curious and willing to explore the less trodden path. HOPE loves seeing options and acting on them. HOPE can be lost and can also be restored.

Unlike despair, with its bleak outlook, HOPE lets us see there are solutions. With HOPE there is no place for “if” something will happen. Rather, HOPE considers, “What is needed? How is it done? Who do I need to become? How is it possible, first in the world, and then for me?”

HOPE is essential for you to achieve beyond your current limits. If you don’t have HOPE that your life can be different, then you must borrow my HOPE. I have an abundance of HOPE, and will gladly loan you as much as you need until you have restored your own.

HOPE is a feeling of expectation and a desire for certain things to happen. It involves trust, and for many who will journey in this space, trust has been broken early on in life. The good news is that trust can be restored too.

There’s no need to have any pain in advance of making this journey, as you don’t know what’s in store for you until you arrive. What’s “in store” you ask? This is my metaphor for the place you will find the “stock of life.” Shelves lined with the many options and choices life has to offer you. And rather than feel overwhelmed, you will have the critical thinking skills, good decision making strategies and the self-regulation to guide your choices – careful selections that have the highest probability of giving you what you seek from that choice. How do you get these critical thinking skills, good decision making strategies and the self-regulation to guide your choices? You learn them; either from me, someone else or on your own, but you learn them because they are essential to your happier, more productive and successful adult life.

When it comes to HOPE, there are two groups of people: High HOPE people and Low HOPE people. Let me tell you a little bit about each of them. High HOPE people set difficult goals for themselves and have several goals in different life areas at the same time. They embrace their goals and view them as welcome challenges. They use their goals as mental touchstones for success, direct their attention and effort to the demands of the situation, and are spurred on by obstacles to greater effort. They think of alternative routes to their goals when things get tough, and they are getting blocked. They apply themselves to the path that is most likely to work for them. They have a strong connection to their life goals and expect to obtain excellent returns on their mental investments. And they are typically optimistic, have a sense of control over their life, good problem-solving abilities, high self-esteem, and a positive mood.

Low HOPE people tend to quit because they are not trained to think of alternative routes; they have one route and they go that route. They do not actively pursue goals and are more concerned with protecting themselves than striking out to achieve. They are typically pessimistic, have no real sense of control over their life, have limited problem-solving abilities, lower self-esteem, and have a less positive mood. And, they tend to believe that things are tougher than they really are. This creates stress and a narrow vision of how best to go about solving the problem.

As you think of your own HOPE level, if it’s low, is that because you are missing many of the skills that High HOPE people have that allows them to be High HOPE people? If so, remember that you can learn these skills even now, and become a High HOPE person and achieve your goals; you can!!

Just because your life, prior to now, may have been a series of disappointments or disasters, doesn’t mean it will remain that way. Of course, if you continue to do what you’ve always done, you will most likely get what you’ve always gotten. However, choosing to do just one thing differently than you’ve done in the past, you have altered the course of your life in a small way in that moment. Imagine tossing a positive pebble into the stream of your life and seeing where it takes you. A small difference in this moment becomes a much greater difference over time.

Christine Mason Miller said, “When we focus our energy towards constructing a passionate meaningful life, we are tossing a pebble into the world, creating a beautiful ripple effect of inspiration. When one person follows a dream, tries something new or takes a daring leap, everyone nearby feels that energy and before too long, they are making their own daring leaps and inspiring yet another circle.”

We inspire each other to act. And, we may never know how many lives we touch by our willingness to follow our dream.

Take another couple of deep relaxing breaths and clear your mind of the Low HOPE and High HOPE people for the time being, because I want to introduce you to the Optimist and the Pessimist, and their three important differences. The Optimist places the blame for a bad outcome on factors outside of themselves; an external explanation so it’s about others, not about them. The Pessimist places blame on themselves; it’s entirely their fault. The Optimist evaluates a failure or undesired outcome by whether or not it will continue into the future; if it’s a setback (which is longer) or promises to be a temporary thing (shorter) – like, “I only messed up this one time” rather than something that will continue in the future. The Pessimist evaluates every failure or undesired outcome as immediate, a setback (much longer) and that nothing will ever work out (meaning global and permanent). The Optimist concludes that a failure or an undesired outcome only happened in one performance area, like a specific situation (a work presentation, forming a new habit, etc.), rather than an overgeneralization (which would be everywhere!). An example might be, “I’m a lousy swimmer but you should see me play basketball or baseball.” The Pessimist generalizes a failure or an undesired outcome to every area of their life; failure in one area equals failure everywhere in their life forever.

Are you sensing how the meaning you make out of any experience influences how you think about what happened, how you feel about the outcome or yourself, and the actions you take? I hope so.

Many of you are schlepping a lot of baggage from your past. Does your “carry on baggage” contain phrases like, “You’ll never amount to anything” or “Who do you think you are?” Perhaps you have memories of a poor grade on a class paper; followed by a lecture at home? Or, being let go from a job that you had given your all to for years? You’ve been looking and applying to many positions yet unable to secure employment for years? Your marriage or long-term relationship abruptly ended, and it had meant everything to you? Or, perhaps at a very young age, you endured such hardships as physical, mental, emotional, verbal, or spiritual abuse from those closest to you; people who were “supposed to be safe and trustworthy.” That’s a lot of baggage weighing you down, slowing you down, and taking a lot of your energy from the present time.

There will be times as we journey together, that I will ask you to consider shedding some of your baggage so you can travel lighter. In 1990 Jerry Lansdowne wrote a song entitled, Travel Light…”take with you the best and leave the rest behind. Time goes by but you find you’re still a prisoner of old feelings.” Take a listen; it’s well worth it.

Years ago I created a process I call “Leaving Home.” It became clear that no one had the experience I was describing, and we needed it to release what didn’t serve us and embrace what would. So many of us had been raised in homes where we heard phrases of absolutism; “there is only one truth, ours, and that’s just how it is.” Come to find out that’s not true. That was your parents’ truth; and it doesn’t have to be yours. There comes a time when every adult needs to “leave home” beyond physically doing so, and take with them only that which will serve them in their own life by self-examination and letting go.

The philosopher Descartes believed the only way to overcome personal prejudices and preconceived notions was to doubt everything one believes and start over by developing a method that would guarantee absolute certainty. The “Leaving Home” process is not that absolute or extreme; yet it is “cleaning house” of the “not me” baggage.

As I said at the beginning of this episode, according to Jim Rohn, “For things to change, you have to change.” Of course you do; you know that. Yet, you may not know how to change. You may be willing to change and be open to change, yet don’t know how to get started and what the necessary steps are to change from what is true today to what you want to be true tomorrow or into the future. I get it. Again, it’s another reason why I created the ADDventures in Achievement program, because this is NOT easy stuff to do on your own; it just isn’t.

Having a safe space that’s free of judgment, full of support, and provides you with the information you need to make the changes you need to make, is the type of environment you need so you can change, and things can change for you. And again, whether you do that with me, someone else or on your own, these are the elements I see is necessary for deeper changes to be possible.

And, in order for you to move from being a Low Hope person to a High Hope person or from being a Pessimist to being an Optimist or for you to release all the excess baggage you’ve been carrying around for years, you’re going to need many of the pre-skills or mindsets I’ve talked about before, such as prioritizing, focusing, planning, scheduling, following through, transitioning from task to task, keeping your word to yourself, closing all your exits so you eliminate choosing again, setting boundaries, making good decisions and knowing why they are in advance, and so much more.

And just to give you a “heads up,” in the next week or two I’m going to be talking about Strengths, or rather “your strengths,” and how knowing what they are can help you leverage them for greater success plus navigate your challenges more easily. I’ll be including a link for a free survey in that episode so you can assess your Strengths. In case you thinking that you need to jump on this right away and get this handled, there is no way you can take action on all of this at the same time. You’re going to need to prioritize and set up a sequence of learning and mastery that fits your needs. Otherwise, you are going to set yourself up for some serious overwhelm and disappointment. Have the tortoise mindset, one of consistent effort and progress every day, rather than the hare mindset, where you get that quick start but no consistency or staying power; the tortoise will serve you well in the long run.

How you think about and interpret your external environment is the KEY. Making empowering meaning is KEY to your success. An example – sensory specific information about a glass of water (just the facts without meaning) = it is at approximately half of the glass capacity (fact). The meanings you can give it can be that the glass is half empty or the glass is half full. Both meanings are true. Now the important part – which meaning is empowering and which is disempowering to you? If the glass is half empty, does that imply “lack” to you? The glass “lacks” the other half? If the glass is half full, does that imply “process” to you; meaning it is half full and will soon be full? Something to consider since you are the meaning maker of your life events, and can choose your meanings rather than allow a default meaning from your “carry on baggage.”


Remember to keep the neurological levels in mind as you are setting yourself up for success, and make sure that each of these areas supports your greater success:

· Your Environment – the external space you operate in, with all it challenges and opportunities. Do what you can to minimize the challenges in your space.

· Your Behaviors – the specific actions you take or reactions you have to what you do

· Your Capabilities – the strategies and states you have access to, to pursue your goals

· Your Belief System – the values and meanings that you give to things, since you are the “meaning maker”

· Your Identity – the statement you make about who you are, and what you have permission to do

· Your Spirit – the vision and purpose of your life; the greater meaning you give it


When I consider these neurological levels, I start with my spirit and let that flow into my identity, then into my belief system, my capabilities, my behaviors and finally into my environment. I’ve found that by allowing my highest level, which is spirit, inform the other levels, the outcomes are much more successful, because I am eliminating options or choices that just don’t fit with my higher self.

So back to HOPE; where were you supposed to learn how to have HOPE? Who was supposed to teach you? I can’t answer that but what I can say is that if you are a Low HOPE person right now, then you need to take responsibility for learning how to increase your level of HOPE, as well as shifting your point of view to Optimism if you’re a Pessimist. You need these changes for your success. Become a student of your own life because you’re going to need to discover a lot of things about yourself so you can solve the challenges you are facing. I believe there are answers and solutions to all of the challenges that we as adults with ADHD face, if we get the information we need to sort out the challenges and see what the underlying issues actually are. It’s kind of like being a detective and investigating your own life.

Over the course of my 66 years now, I’ve experienced many different challenges, and needed to overcome them if I was going to live the life that was anything close to what I hoped for, and I also needed to overcome them if I was going to shed some light and guide others, perhaps like you, out of your stuckness, into the life you’ve been wanting forever. My phrase for that journey is moving from stuck to unstoppable.

As I’ve said before, I’m a work in progress, just like you. I still have lots of things to figure out so I can keep moving forward; it’s just part of the adventure of life. The difference now is that I’m a High HOPE person and an Optimist. I get solutions-oriented and start figuring out HOW I am going to get something done; not give in to the thoughts that there’s no way that it can happen. That’s just my Pessimist mind telling me a lie.

We’re getting closer to today’s three important points, with relevant stories, action steps, and a favorite quote of mine. Let’s keep going…

I want you to remember that you are called a “human being” for a reason; because “being” isn’t about “doing;” it’s about “being” your best human self. And while you’re “being” your best human self, you can work on the “human doing” stuff you want to achieve, which will most likely require you to learn some new skills, strategies and shift your mindset to something that empowers you.

How much time do we have? Not much. So let’s get to it.

In this episode, I’m going to talk about how you can make the changes you need to make so things can change for you for the better.


Today’s 3 important points are:

1. Transitioning from a Low HOPE to a High HOPE person

2. Transforming your Pessimist self into an Optimist

3. How to “Leave Home” beyond just physically and create your own life


Now back to being an adult with ADHD in today’s world.

It’s almost story time but first, yours WIN; that one thing that’s gone right today or is right with you. Perhaps you decided that you have the right to enjoy your life, starting today; that’s a WIN. Or maybe you shared a WIN in the community group; that’s a WIN. Or maybe you allowed yourself to feel your feelings and sought to understand them, rather than pushing them aside; certainly a WIN. And, if you’re some place you can do this, maybe go stand in front of a mirror and tell yourself face-to-face about your WINS. See if you “feel your WINS” more deeply that way; just a suggestion. You know, your mind can become consumed with the negatives and what’s wrong with you or your life, instead of what’s right. And since what you obsess on grows, it seems better to obsess on what’s right than what’s wrong; don’t you think? You are a precious child of the universe; and are called a “human being” not a “human doing.” You don’t have to earn your value; you were born with it. You’re value comes from “who” you are; not what you do. Got it?


So let’s transition to our first story…

· Doris was a high school student who felt she had ADHD but had never been assessed. She shared her concerns with her family several times but nothing seemed to come of those quick little chats.

· She was now in her senior year and had wanted to attend college for as long as she could remember, but with her grades, she didn’t even think that a junior college would take her. She felt very discouraged.

· Doris had never been an “options thinker;” meaning that she had never thought about having a backup plan if what she was interested in doing didn’t work out. In fact, she usually just quit when things started to get difficult because she didn’t feel confident that she could solve the challenges she encountered. Every problem looked huge to Doris; whether it really was or not that’s how it appeared to her.

· About seven months before graduation, Doris learned about a research study for teens with ADHD that included a full assessment as well as some short-term treatment. She brought the information to her parents and asked if they would call to see if she qualified, and if so, would they let her participate. Her parents agreed and Doris waited anxiously for two days until her parents finally contacted the researcher and learned that Doris was qualified to participate if she did indeed have ADHD. So an appointment was set for the interview and initial assessment.

· Doris was anxious to get to the appointment and learn if she did indeed have ADHD and what a difference it might make in her life if she got some treatment; even if it was short-term. If it helped her, she could always ask her parents to help her get the same treatment for long-term from their own family doctor.

· In fact, Doris started to wonder if it was true that she had ADHD, how quickly could treatment change how difficult things had been for her. If she continued to apply herself and work hard as she had been doing forever, would treatment make it possible for her to be considered for a junior college? She didn’t know how quickly things could change and whether or not six or seven months would be enough time to turn things around grade-wise. Maybe there would be a letter that could be written on her behalf indicating that this was a new diagnosis and she was receiving treatment and there was improvement and there would be more as time went on.

· Doris’s mind continued to race with thoughts like this for the next 5 days until her study appointment. It was finally the day and she was a bit nervous now. She hoped she would learn something that day that could turn her life around, and Doris was not to be disappointed.

· She had her assessment and it was conclusive that she had been living with untreated ADHD for years. With her parents’ consent, she was prescribed a low dose of medication as treatment in the study, and the medication helped Doris a lot. So much so, that she was able to bring up her grades enough in the six months before graduation so that she could apply to the local junior college and most likely be accepted. She was thrilled!


Background facts: · Doris had always been a Low HOPE person. She couldn’t set difficult goals for herself because she knew that she would not be able to achieve them. It was hard enough for her to get through the bare essentials of her day-to-day responsibilities without adding more challenges. Obstacles definitely didn’t excite her; she just shut down or ran away because she got overwhelmed.

· Until she got the information about the study, she had no idea how to figure out whether or not she had ADHD and what could be done about it. Perhaps her parents should have done more for her about this, however, when you grow up in a family where one or both parents also have undiagnosed or untreated ADHD, the kids often don’t get the help they need until later in life.

· It’s common for those with undiagnosed or untreated ADHD to view things as being much tougher than it actually is, or a much bigger problem than it actually is; their skills to accurately assess are lacking.

· And if the modeling that kids see is parents who quit on things or don’t follow through or don’t pursue alternative options when faced with a problem, then this is what they learn to do in their own life.


If you relate to Doris’ story, here are your action steps:

o Focus on identifying where you’re a High HOPE person and where you are a Low HOPE person

o Follow Through once you understand the difference between High and Low Hope people, on what you need to work on to raise your level of HOPE and where.

o Self-Management of your emotions when you confront the challenges of being a Low HOPE person, such as your sense of lack of control, low self-esteem and less than positive mood and work your way through these feelings to feeling better about yourself. You might need to have a few small WINS to remind yourself that you can overcome challenges and obstacles and to keep going.


Transitioning to our second story…

· Mark grew up hearing and believing that everything that went wrong was his fault; whether it was true or not. Some how he ended up being the family scapegoat and it stuck. Besides, he could always find evidence that supported it being his fault so it was easy to feel how he did. He certainly made a lot of mistakes that were his fault, so why not blame himself for everything because it was just easier that way. He didn’t have the ability to see that anyone else had any part in the things that happened that went wrong; so he took full blame for everything.

· Mark’s childhood role models, his father and his uncle, both alcoholics, didn’t help his view of what would be possible for him. Even though he was not an alcoholic, he had that dark side to his personality that his father and uncle also had. Plus, his father blamed Mark for everything that went wrong in the family, whether it was true or not and since Mark loved his father and never considered that his father could be lying to him, he took the daily blame that was dished out to him.

· Now in his 30s, Mark was suffering from chronic depression because failure felt like a personal failure; like he was a failure rather than he failed to achieve the goal he set for himself. He felt trapped. And for most of his 30 years, things just continued to go wrong for him, so he concluded that nothing was ever going to work out for him and that’s just the way it was going to be forever.

· Mark’s depression caused him to distort reality and view everything through the lens of the hopelessness of depression. Plus he was a pretty black and white thinker and figured that it was illogical that he could have success in one area of his life while all the other areas would be failures. It was just easier to think of his entire life as a failure.

· And with the type of depression that Mark suffered from, medications would never release him from its grasp because there are no skills or insights in pills. Mark would need to see his life and its events through a very different lens.

· His friends would tell him to “lighten up” and let things go. They would challenge him to see that certain things just couldn’t be his fault and yet Mark was unable to shift his perspective on where the blame should fall; and it always fell on him.


Background facts:

· It is a serious matter when you take behavioral failures and turn them into an identity of being a failure as a person.

· That’s what happened to Mark. It started out that it was just a bunch of things that he was failing at: his school work, his friendships with the kids at school, his responsibilities in his family life, and as he got a little bit older, it became his failures at work and his seeming inability to hold a job for longer than a month or two.

· There’s even a difference between having a pessimistic point of view and being a pessimist. When you have that point of view, those are behaviors and ways of thinking. When you are that, it’s a statement about who you are to the core, your identity and that becomes a more entrenched pattern and belief to undo. It can be changed, however, it’s a lot more work than just undoing behaviors.


If you relate to Mark’s story, here are your action steps:

· Focus on the source of your pessimism and ask yourself if you are open to letting it go in favor of a more optimistic point of view.

· Follow Through on whatever you are willing to work on initially and shift that point of view. You might start with the black and white thinking and challenge it. There are typically exceptions that you can point out to yourself to see that it isn’t all or nothing; there are shades of gray or exceptions.

· Self-Management of your feelings when you consider shifting from a pessimistic to an optimistic point of view. You might feel that it’s fake or phony and balk at making the transition. In time, it will feel more real to you as you experience more and more of your life optimistically. It’s certainly a much lighter feeling.


Transitioning to our third story…

· Lorna left home at 18 because she just had to get away from all the negativity of her parents and siblings. It was oppressive for her and she felt like she couldn’t breathe.

· It would be more accurate to say that she “physically left home;” because she carried a lot of her childhood with her when she left home. All the oppressive beliefs of her parents came with her and she just didn’t know what to do about that. She thought for sure when she left home that she would be free of them and instead, she was horrified to hear their words coming out of her mouth on a daily basis.

· She knew that she couldn’t continue this way, and sought the help of a talented therapist to guide her through this process of “Leaving Home.” Lorna and the therapist sorted out, as many of the beliefs as possible that Lorna was carrying that didn’t serve her and set them aside. There were certainly beliefs that did serve her, such as look both ways before you cross the street. That was a keeper because it was about her safety and made good sense.

· With the beliefs that Lorna wasn’t going to keep, she was able to challenge them, let them go and replace them with more appropriate beliefs for her life; not her parents life.

· Lorna also learned that she had some distorted thinking patterns to clean up besides what she had learned from her parents. She had some “inattention blindness”, which means that when she was focusing her attention on one thing, she was completely missing other things that were present. Becoming aware of the information she was missing was important for her to make better decisions. She also had a bit of self-deception going on which means she often misled herself and was great at justifying false beliefs to herself to make a case for what she wanted to be true; even when it wasn’t. Her therapist helped her to work through these issues as well.


Background Facts:

· Remember what I said earlier about Descartes’ belief that the only way to overcome personal prejudices and preconceived notions would be to doubt everything one believes and start over by developing a method that would guarantee absolute certainty.

· The process I created for “Leaving Home” is initially about our parents having a conversation with us that they never did, and giving us permission to challenge everything they told us and decide for ourselves what to keep and what to let go of and replace with something that serves us more authentically now.

· I will probably write up this process and create a process program out of it so that others can benefit from its power.


If you relate to Lorna’s story, here are your action steps:

· Focus on sorting out the beliefs you will keep and those you will discard and replace.

· Follow Through on determining what your new beliefs will be to serve your life more authentically for who you truly are.

· Self-Management of your many feelings about challenging the family rules or values, even though you have permission to do so and give yourself permission to offer yourself exactly what you need in terms of unconditional love and support as you make your way through this transformational process.


A Favorite Quote: I couldn’t choose one for today, so here are three of my favorites:

Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope.”

Michelle Obama said, “You may not always have a comfortable life and you will not always be able to solve all of the world’s problems at once but don’t ever underestimate the importance you can have because history has shown us that courage can be contagious and hope can take on a life of its own.”

Nelson Mandela said, “Our human compassion binds us the one to the other – not in pity or patronizingly, but as human beings who have learnt how to turn our common suffering into hope for the future.”

And the question I have for you at this point of our journey together is, “If you are a Low HOPE person, are you committed to becoming a High HOPE person starting today?” I hope so because it will make all the difference for the options and outcomes of your life.

That’s about it for today’s episode on HOPE. It means a lot to me to know that your life is getting a little bit better every time we get together. I do HOPE that you will take some of the action steps I’ve suggested because for things to change, you have to change. And that means taking action, like checking out the episode links so you can benefit from all of the resources I continue to create for you in addition to this podcast show, if that’s of interest to you. I’d love to get to know you in the community group I created on Facebook and interact with you when I go live there.

If you benefited from today’s episode, take action now and share this show with your friends and family; perhaps rate the show or even write up an honest review of this episode. Whatever you’re willing to take action on today will ripple out into the world and impact the course of your life as well as that of others you may never know about.

And if you don’t want to have to remember to look for new episodes, just subscribe and the newest episode will be in your feed by 1 am Pacific Time on Mondays and Thursdays.

So thanks for listening… Until the next time… Bye for now…

 

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