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When Criticism Is Abundant & Kind Words Are Scarce - 035

podcast self-esteem Aug 21, 2017

Welcome to the thirty-fifth episode of Harness Your ADHD Power, a podcast show I created to explore the many facets of adult life with ADHD and how you can learn to harness your personal ADHD power to become unstoppable.

I’m so glad you could join me today. Throughout my 30+ years of working with adults with ADHD, Executive Function deficits, depression, anxiety, addictions, and many other co-occurring challenges, I’ve noticed a theme that bears talking about today. And that is the abundance of “symptoms” that often present themselves to us, and are basically saying, “Hey you! There are things you need to pay attention to and take care of here.” And, if we are fortunate enough to both hear and understand the messages of those “symptoms,” and actually take action to search out what the underlying issues are, and follow through on resolving them, we can put an end to a lot of the suffering that we live with. Difficulties and challenges are part of life; ongoing suffering involves your mind and is optional.

So you might be wondering what all of that has to do with the topics abundant criticism and scarcity of kind words. I’ll be getting there, so stay with me on this. I see this episode inter-connected with four others I’ve produced: “027-Figuring out where to start when so much needs your attention now, 001-It’s not your fault & you’re not off the hook either, 030-Ask Dr B – about Stories we tell ourselves, low self-esteem & self-sabotaging behaviors, and 004-What is your procrastination a symptom of?”

If you’re like so many of the adults I work with, you have a ton of issues that all need your attention now and you don’t even know where to start, let alone know how you are going to get them all done. And it hasn’t you're your fault up to this point, because you most likely haven’t been given the information you needed and the path to the learning and mastery of the missing skills, so you could take responsibility and make the necessary changes. And with so many years of failed attempts or failed outcomes, your self-esteem may be quite low, the stories you tell yourself are self-defeating and not empowering you at all and you fell into the trap years ago of short-term solutions or Band-Aids that have now become self-sabotaging behaviors because they were only intended as short-term solutions. And your procrastination “symptoms” are “messengers” telling you where to look for what the underlying issues are but if you don’t know that and have been working on trying to “fix” your procrastination around getting started, keeping going and actually finishing up, then you’ve been chasing after the wrong issues because those are just “symptoms.”

In this episode, I’m going to explore the many ways that criticism is abundant and kind words are scarce in the lives of adults with ADHD and other co-existing conditions. And a little hint: it has to do with your relationship with yourself.

One of the reasons I created my innovative online coaching and educational program, ADDventures in Achievement, is because I know just how complex this situation is, as well as the many other challenges that those of you with focus, follow through and self-management issues face, and I wanted to create a safe and productive space where we could work together, both as a community group as well as 1:1, to ensure that each and every one of you gets what you need to sort out your own unique set of circumstances as well as the solutions to them.

Developing your Executive Function Skills and shifting your limiting beliefs is the fastest and most effective way to overcome ADHD limitations, find focus, gain confidence, and newfound freedom in your life!

My mission is to put an end to the worldwide needless suffering of adults with ADHD and those with under-developed Executive Function Skills - whether from ADHD, chronic depression or anxiety, trauma, addictions, or chronic illnesses.  And, you don't need a formal diagnosis to know you need help developing these executive function skills in order to greatly reduce your suffering.

 

Full Episode Transcript HYAP Podcast Episode #035
When Criticism Is Abundant & Kind Words Are Scarce - 035
Monday, August 21, 2017


Hey ADDers! I’m so glad you could join me today. Throughout my 30+ years of working with adults with ADHD, Executive Function deficits, depression, anxiety, addictions, and many other co-occurring challenges, I’ve noticed a theme that bears talking about today. And that is the abundance of “symptoms” that often present themselves to us, and are basically saying, “Hey you! There are things you need to pay attention to and take care of here.” And, if we are fortunate enough to both hear and understand the messages of those “symptoms,” and actually take action to search out what the underlying issues are, and follow through on resolving them, we can put an end to a lot of the suffering that we live with. Difficulties and challenges are part of life; ongoing suffering involves your mind and is optional.

So you might be wondering what all of that has to do with the topics abundant criticism and scarcity of kind words. I’ll be getting there, so stay with me on this. I see this episode inter-connected with four others I’ve produced: “027-Figuring out where to start when so much needs your attention now, 001-It’s not your fault & you’re not off the hook either, 030-Ask Dr B – about Stories we tell ourselves, low self-esteem & self-sabotaging behaviors, and 004-What is your procrastination a symptom of?”

If you’re like so many of the adults I work with, you have a ton of issues that all need your attention now and you don’t even know where to start, let alone know how you are going to get them all done. And it hasn’t you're your fault up to this point, because you most likely haven’t been given the information you needed and the path to the learning and mastery of the missing skills, so you could take responsibility and make the necessary changes. And with so many years of failed attempts or failed outcomes, your self-esteem may be quite low, the stories you tell yourself are self-defeating and not empowering you at all and you fell into the trap years ago of short-term solutions or Band-Aids that have now become self-sabotaging behaviors because they were only intended as short-term solutions. And your procrastination “symptoms” are “messengers” telling you where to look for what the underlying issues are but if you don’t know that and have been working on trying to “fix” your procrastination around getting started, keeping going and actually finishing up, then you’ve been chasing after the wrong issues because those are just “symptoms.”

You probably lack so many executive function skills that are necessary for you to successfully navigate all the adult responsibilities of your life that you sink into overwhelm at the very thought of it.

Brendon Burchard’s newest book, High Performance Habits, which releases September 19th, is based on years of research his institute undertook, and cites 6 habits that those who achieve success and keep their success have, which are: clarity, energy, necessity, productivity, influence and courage.

When I look at those 6 habits and what is meant by each of them, I can see how those with ADHD and/or EFD could be challenged to achieve and maintain them, without the pre-requisites of certain EF skills. Many qualities, such as consistency, going into action, following through and such are pre-requisites to this higher level of success in life.

And there are other themes of challenges that have been apparent, which are codependent behaviors as a solution to having relationships and being liked, the need for external validation as the solution to receiving validation but definitely not from yourself, and with the poor relationship with yourself, where you get the scraps, come last and don’t really even know yourself, which is how most adults I know are in relationship with themselves, how could you possibly rise up to the successful life you might have envisioned for yourself?

All of these shortsighted and ultimately damaging Band-Aids or short-term solutions have got to stop and be replaced by the fundamental or foundational skills we need to master. It’s like I said in a previous episode, it’s kind of like having a fever (the symptom) and the underlying issue is a raging infection that caused the fever. I hope you’d be treating the raging infection and not just take something for the fever. No different here.

And if you remember from a previous episode where I shared that confidence comes from competence. And “competence” comes form truly having the skills and abilities to do whatever it is that needs doing or you intend to do; rather than flying by the seat of your pants or faking it and “hoping” what you are doing will work. You are either “competent” or you aren’t. And if you truly aren’t yet competent in those pre-requisite skills you need to have and are suffering from lack of confidence or low self-esteem, knowing that you can become more confident once you become competent with the necessary skills and tools should provide a sense of hope.

I think the encouraging point here is that there is a very clear reason for our failures and successes, which means we can change what needs changing, gain the competence we need, and increase our success rate tremendously.

Reflecting on the research Brendon cites, here’s my interpretation for us, and what I see I’ve actually been doing in my own life for several years now:

· Taking a stand each day; physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually
o Before my feet touch the ground each morning, I pause to reflect on how I intend to live my day and what I will “stand for;” which means that at the end of the day when I reflect on my day, I need to see “evidence” that I did indeed “stand for” that in my actions and interactions, otherwise, I did not “stand for” that, even though it was my intention.

· Who I need to be each day in relationship to the people in my life that I will be interacting with
o Instead of just “a template Dr B” that people have to try and relate to, I have seen it as my responsibility as the communicator or initiator, to consider the needs of those who I am relating to and consider how they might best “hear” me or “receive me” and go with that.

· Taking a skills inventory every day to see what I know how to do or don’t, and what to do to get those skills
o Since I no longer judge myself for lacking skills or abilities and don’t view the lack as a moral issue about who I am or am not, it has been much easier to do a daily inventory and take care of the gaps that I find.

· Living authentically as the “me” I know myself to be now, based on the time I’ve made “sacred” in my schedule to get to know myself
o Years ago I had a life changing experience in a grief recovery workshop hosted by The Grief Recovery Institute. I was the participant chosen to have died. I had written out my final words and thoughts a few hours earlier and said whom I wanted them left to. That person would read them to the group and as I lay on the floor, under the white sheet covering me, I got to listen to what I had written as well as the comments from the other workshop participants. As I listened to what I had written, I decided that could not be the life I would reflect on, hopefully years from that moment, when my actual time came. I knew as I listened that I had to live a life that made a bigger difference and made me proud to listen to my eulogy. The one I wrote years ago definitely didn’t do that; it was superficial at best and not reflective of the me I knew that lived inside of me but had been too scared to venture out into the world and be expressed fully.

And if you mind is shouting, “This all sounds very nice for you Dr B, but I don’t see it happening for me anytime soon,” well, we all start where we are right now. I had to start where I was years ago and it was a much longer way to travel than I ever anticipated, but I figured, if I quit I’ll only have more of the same or worse and if I keep going and get the right tools and information for me, then my future will be brighter and happier. And guess what? At 66 years young, I am the happiest I have yet to be in my entire lifetime, and anticipate it will continue to get even better as I continue to practice and master the skills and tools I need in my life now to take me to that next level of personal development and achievement for me. As one of my teacher’s puts it, “what got you here won’t get you there; how true that is.”

Whatever is needed is unique to each of us, based of our history, deficits, beliefs, values and current ability to be motivated (meaning having a good enough reason) to take action; right action. Many are taking action and keeping busy all day long but not necessarily taking the right action or working on the right issues for the greatest leverage and successful outcomes.

And I’ll tell you from my experiences thus far; resilience is definitely a skill that is needed for the long-term journey. Resilience is that skill or ability to “bounce back” from the adversities we all face as we meet the challenges we each have to face and grow from.

Remember, not achieving your goals or objectives thus far doesn’t make YOU a failure; it only means that you’ve failed to achieve an outcome (which is behavioral) but that your value as a human being is still intact, since you are not what you do or don’t do; you are more than that. YOU are NOT defective or less than as you – as a human being; you’re just wired differently and that difference is actually pretty cool once you have the tools you need for your own success. I hope you will find some of what you need here with me, as you listen to each episode.

I look at my journey forward as being enrolled in the “school of life,” and that each experience provides me with something new to learn if I look at it that way. Just as I had favorite classes and those that I disliked, life is like that too. I don’t have to like every experience I have; however, it’s important for me to learn from each experience life provides me and see it in the bigger context of life, so that I can continue to shape who I am becoming. I remind myself daily to be mindful of who I am becoming on the way to where it is that I am going so that I don’t end up having reached my destinations only to not like who I’ve become; that would be awful.

We’re getting closer to today’s 3 important points, with relevant stories, an action step, and a favorite quote of mine. Let’s keep going…

Please understand that unpacking very complicated issues takes time, effort and energy and the ability to self-reflect on what you find. Don’t rush yourself; take your time and be thorough. That way you won’t have to swing back around and investigate things all over again. Seriously!!

In this episode, I’m going explore the many ways that criticism is abundant and kind words are scarce in the lives of adults with ADHD and other co-existing conditions. And a little hint: it has to do with your relationship with yourself.

How much time do we have? Not much. So let’s get to it.

Today’s 3 important points are:
1. The stories you tell yourself, how it fuels your self-criticism and what it takes to change your stories
2. Reasons why kind words might be scarce in your life, the beliefs and values that drive that and steps you can take
3. Embracing and integrating all those things that need your attention now and moving forward into the life worth living that you deserve

Now back to being an adult with ADHD in today’s world.

It’s almost story time but first, YOUR WINS. What’s it going to be today? Perhaps you struck up a conversation with a stranger and made a difference in their day and yours; that’s a WIN. Or maybe you started a success journal to remind you of each new skill you are learning and mastering; certainly a WIN. Or perhaps decided to set up a reminder system and actually respond to it’s cues rather than dismissing them; that’s definitely a WIN. Whatever you choose is up to you; however, I want you to choose something and celebrate it right now – either a loud or to yourself. I want you to really FEEL that WIN, and acknowledge that at least one thing has gone right in your day, is right about you, even if everything else looks bleak right now. I get it! And, that doesn’t take away from the fact that at least one thing has gone right today or is right with you. You are a precious child of the universe; and are called a “human being” not a “human doing” for good reason. You don’t have to earn your value; you were born with it. You’re value comes from “who” you are; not what you do. Got it?

The reasons you are where you are in your life are unique to you. And, I hope that at least one of these stories will resonate with you and be of benefit. So let’s keep going.

Shifting gears to our first story:
· Patrick had the gift of a vivid imagination, and he often disappeared into his “fantasy world” when the “real world” just didn’t feel good to him. In his “fantasy world” he was a warrior, a hero and someone important. He was capable in his “fantasy world” and was making a difference for himself and others. He felt really good about himself so long as he lived in that “fantasy world.”

· It was definitely a problem when he stepped out of fantasy into reality though because his reality was depressing to him, and he had just recently started taking antidepressant medication in the hopes of raising his mood.

· There may have been reasons for Patrick to be taking an antidepressant; I can’t say. However, what was apparent was in the “real world” he “felt like a failure” and thought of himself as a “failure” because he had failed to achieve so many of his dreams and goals time and time again. People told him to have a more positive outlook and be optimistic, but he thought their advice was stupid since he could see the truth about himself and his life. It was going nowhere and had fast become a real downer to him and those around him.

· How many times did he start the day with “good intentions” only to find himself in an emotional ditch at the end of the day; nowhere close to his “good intentions” for the day.

· He didn’t know what was wrong with him, and so he had “made up” various stories about himself to try and help himself make sense of his life. None of these “stories” were loving, supportive, validating or helpful in any way to his self-esteem or positive self-regard. In fact, quite the opposite was true. Everything he made up about himself in these stories was focused on targeting him as a “less than” person and “a failure.” With stories like these, his depression was sure to get its daily dose of reinforcement and he would probably stay depressed.

· Patrick never had a kind word for himself because he grew up with so much criticism from his parents, teachers and friends that he had no modeling for such a thing. He didn’t feel that he deserved to be treated with kindness and compassion because he was such a failure. And when the rare occasion occurred that he actually was able to do something “right,” he didn’t give himself any praise either, because after all it was just what he was “supposed to be doing all along” and not worthy of praise; that was ridiculous in his mind.

· The doctor who was prescribing his antidepressant only saw him about every 2 or 3 months as his prescriber and wasn’t someone to discuss the challenges or solutions with; and he had no other support or person to turn to. His friends were all “so done” with hearing the same stories over and over again of his good intentions and failed outcomes. They certainly lacked the compassionate ear that Patrick sorely needed and lacked at that time in his life.

· Tony, a relatively new friend of Patrick’s who also had ADHD and used to be depressed shared a book with him that had helped Tony break free of a lot of his own negativity and bad outcomes. It was a book about the connection between thoughts, feelings and actions. · Patrick hadn’t known Tony for long but respected the fact that Tony was working on himself and changing his life. It was noticeable to Patrick, and since he was a kind of, “show me kind of guy,” he decided he had nothing to lose by getting the book, reading it and doing his best to change his thoughts, feelings and actions like Tony was doing. Plus, Tony told Patrick that he could call him any time and he would help him if he could. That was encouraging to Patrick to have someone who didn’t criticize him and actually was there to be supportive and helpful. This was a first for Patrick.


Background facts:
· Two modalities of therapeutic work that can be useful when you need to work with your thoughts, feelings and actions are Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or CBT and Dialectical-Behavioral Therapy or DBT. They are both science-driven modalities for making changes.
· CBT is a psychotherapy that is based on the cognitive model: the way you perceive a situation is more closely connected to your reaction than the situation itself.
o A few key concepts of CBT are
§ That it’s foundation is based in emotional, behavioral and physiological upon which there is the
· Situation
· Your automatic thoughts and images
· Your reaction

· DBT is a psychotherapy that emphasizes skill development through individual and group work. The four modules of skills training are:
o Mindfulness – the practice of being fully aware and present in this one moment
o Distress Tolerance – how to tolerate pain in difficult situations, not change it
o Interpersonal Effectiveness – how to ask for what you want and say no while maintaining self-respect and relationships with others
o Emotion Regulation – how to change emotions that you want to change

· The difference between CBT and DBT is the “dialectic” piece which is the “weighing and integrating of contradictory facts or ideas with a view to resolving apparent contradictions.” An example could be that someone can love you and disagree with you. There are many adults who believe that this is not true or possible; that if someone loves them, then they don’t disagree with them, and that disagreeing with them means that they don’t love them.

· DBT is a synthesis or integration of opposites.


If you relate to Patrick’s story, here’s your action step:

o Focus – on determining whether CBT or DBT might be a good fit for you to work with, what changes you want to make, how you want to feel as a result of making those changes, and the new stories you are creating about yourself
o Follow Through – on working on the changes you identified and committed to make; whether with solo work from a book or working with a professional, and keep track of your progress to keep yourself motivated
o Self-Management – of your feelings as you are making the changes. Watch out for sabotaging feelings and have a plan in place for managing them with self-love and compassion, when they arise. Treat yourself according to your new stories, not your old ones.


Transitioning to our next story:

· To the outside world, Hilda looked like she was a good person, a happy person, and doing well in her life. However, her inner world was far from what others saw on the outside.

· Because she had no foundation for kindness to herself, she was cruel and rather heartless when it came to her self-talk. She tried to motivate herself the same way her parents and teachers had tried to motivate her since she was a kid. That was some 40 years ago and yet it was as if it was yesterday in her memories. She knew the tone, the cutting edge of sarcasm and disdain that were her everyday companions growing up, and had been adopted by her as she transitioned into her adult life.

· And Hilda hadn’t spent much time reflecting on her beliefs or values as she was growing up because they were pretty much “dictated to her” and she just accepted that this is how it is. She hadn’t intentionally decided on the quality of relationship she would have with herself; rather she continued with the emotionally abusive relationship of her childhood.

· When it came to asking herself to do something for herself, it’s as if it was falling on deaf ears. She heard it but ignored the requests or demands because she was feeling rebellious by now and didn’t want to respond to the demands she felt she was putting on herself.

· When she did actually do some things that were needed, or did a great job at something, there was no praise forthcoming from her. She realized the reason she didn’t praise herself for a job well done was because it didn’t carry any weight. If someone else praised her, she felt the praise and appreciation from him or her, but if she gave the same to herself, she felt pretty much nothing. Obviously she let the opinions and values of others weigh in much heavier than those of her. This meant she was dependent on the opinions of others for any good feeling or validation that she would experience. She had given away all of her power to what others thought rather than value what she thought and felt more.

· In fact, Hilda was so hungry for the praise, validation and approval of others that she had completely abandoned herself in the pursuit of it. It was as if she was begging others to acknowledge her and give her value because she didn’t have much in her own eyes. People could sense the desperation in her voice and actions and over the years. Many people used Hilda as she attempted to meet her needs from others.

· Hilda felt a lot of shame about her neediness and feelings of abandonment. Whenever someone took care of their own needs and choose something other than what Hilda needed them to choose, she felt that they had abandoned her; had rejected her. The fact is that they had only chosen to do what they needed to do for themselves, rather than what she wanted them to do for her.

· The simplest example I’ve used over the years is about ice cream. There were three flavors: strawberry, vanilla and chocolate. Whenever someone came into the ice cream parlor and made their selection, they were “choosing” the flavor they wanted, and “not choosing” the other flavors; that is their right. They were not “rejecting” the other flavors or abandoning them and leaving them in the ice cream parlor; they had their preference and went with that. If the other flavors were to have taken each person’s choice personally, it would be an awful experience for those three flavors every time a customer came into the parlor.


Background facts:
· I have found a very high incidence of codependent behavior patterns in adults with ADHD and/or Executive Function deficits. It seems to be the more immediate solution to the feeling of rejection or abandonment by others that those growing up with these challenges have chosen.

· As with every short-term solution and goes long-term, what was once the solution is now a new problem in need of a solution. This is the case with codependency, which put simply, is an absence of a healthy relationship with yourself. It’s not about restricting yourself from helping others or doing for them, it’s about abandoning yourself and choosing the needs of others before your own needs.

· And people get used to you putting their needs first, and come to expect that treatment, so when you make changes and no longer choose to live according to a codependent way of life, others push back and get upset. And, if you haven’t yet learned how to navigate the “push back,” you might just slip back into codependent behaviors and abandon yourself once more. In my experience as an adult, I no longer feel abandoned by others because I have stopped abandoning myself.


If you relate to Hilda’s story, here’s your action step:
o Focus – on gaining clarity about the relationship you want to have with yourself, which includes how you will treat yourself and speak to yourself, without exception, and write it out as a pledge or vow to yourself
o Follow Through – on living in relationship with yourself according to your pledge or vow and take a daily inventory of how you are doing so you can make the adjustments you need to make day-by-day to bring your actions more and more inline with your pledge to yourself.
o Self-Management – of your feelings about yourself and giving yourself permission to raise the value you feel for and about yourself. By claiming equal value for yourself to others, you may have to manage the internal dialogue and chatter of objections and negative self-talk saying things like, “who do you think you are” or “what makes you think that you deserve to treat and value yourself without the input of others?”


Transitioning to our next story:

· Rita and Wayne had let so many things pile up over the years that they needed to address. In their situation, it wasn’t lots of physical things or life tasks that needed their attention; it was all the needs and issues between them in their marriage. If they were going to improve the quality of their life together, they really need to make a clean sweep of things and kind of create a “Day 1” to reboot their relationship.

· The thing with “starting again” is that neither of you are the same person you were years ago, and I’m not saying that you want to try and go back to being that person or behaving the way you did, especially if how you behaved wasn’t healthy for your relationship back then. Instead, you need to forgive both yourself and the other person for how you behaved and took care of yourself years ago, how you’ve abandoned yourself over the years and how you are going to change now. You have to let go of what happened in the past that you were responsible for and that the other person was responsible for since you can’t change the past; you can only change what you commit to do differently now and in the future.

· The biggest challenge they seemed to be experiencing was the lack of feeling appreciated by the other. It seemed that they each needed the validation and approval of the other and when they couldn’t get it, they each felt hurt and disappointed. This hurt and disappointment was the size of the Grand Canyon at this point and needed to be sized down and resolved if things were to get better between them.

· They were going to need to clearly communicate to the other what they felt they were missing from the other and see if they could meet the needs of the other; to see if it was doable without abandoning their own needs now.


Background Facts:
· Sometimes what is needed is something very simply; like feeling that you are part of the communication from the other person, rather than feeling like they are not considering you and your needs in what is being proposed.

· Other people feel that they are doing this and yet they aren’t. When they present what they have considered, they don’t say the other person’s name, don’t say that they know that what they are proposing will impact that person in the ways that they say, and that what is being proposed will also impact them and others in the family, and that the two solutions being proposed are the best they could come up with that would have the least impact on everyone; kind of a shared impact.

· When others hear specifically that their needs were fully considered when the solutions were being evaluated, they can feel appreciated, valued and considered by the other. When they don’t specifically hear that this was done, they often feel that their needs are not important to the other person, which is typically not the case.


If you relate to Rita and Wayne’s story, here’s your action step:

o Focus – on knowing your needs and the needs of everyone to be considered in the solutions.

o Follow Through – on being very clear in your communication style, language and choice of words to convey to others that you have indeed taken them and their needs into consideration, just as much as you have your own needs; that their needs are as important to you as your own needs and you want them to be happy; that you want everyone in the family to be happy with the solutions to the best of your ability to come up with such solutions.

o Self-Management – of your feelings when others “push back” or “challenge you” about how you came up with these possible solutions and whether you did indeed consider them as fully as you said you did. You need to understand that they are vested in getting their needs met and knowing that they were truly considered by you, so watch you response or reaction to what others say or challenge you on. There is no need to become defensive; instead be calm and clear with your responses to their genuine concerns. Treat them as if they were your own concerns, with the respect and response they deserve.


A Favorite Quote:

Sharon Salzberg said, “Loving-kindness and compassion are the basis for wise, powerful, sometimes gentle, and sometimes fierce actions that can really make a difference – in our own lives and those of others.’” The question I have for you at this point of our journey together is, “Are you willing to cultivate loving-kindness and compassion for yourself and give it with grace, if you don’t already do so?” I hope so because it will change your life.


It takes courage to look at the truth of your life and accept what you find. Acceptance isn’t resignation; it’s starting with what is and moving forward from there. That’s what we’re doing in the ADDventures in Achievement online program. It’s the place to be if you want access to me 6 days a week for the solutions, not Band-Aids, to the challenges you’ve been stuck in for years. Let me help make a difference in your life through all the resources of that program and get you moving from stuck to unstoppable.

All the resource links are in the episode description as well as on my website. Be sure to take advantage of everything I continue to generate with you in mind. And do reach out to me directly if you have the need. I really do want to hear from you, so I can best serve your needs.

And no matter how you choose to have me serve your needs, it’s an honor to accompany you on your journey and make a difference in the quality of your life.

Thanks for spending time with me today. New episodes are released on Mondays and Thursdays. As a subscriber, episodes are in your feed by 1 am Pacific time, plus you won’t miss out on any “new and different I create;” certainly a good reason to subscribe. Remember to listen for answers to your questions, if you asked any of me, or just enjoy all the episodes.

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So, that’s about it for today. You know where to look if you want access to the resources I’ve created for you, that is…if that’s of interest to you. Thanks for listening… Until the next time…Bye for now…

 

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